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A. Haim Berger. Photo: Avraham Soskin
B. License to immigrate to Land of Israel, given to Haim in Vienna, 1921
C. Text printed on certificate
D. Nebi Rubin
E. Gezer tunnel, 1929
F. Manoach's altar

With a stick and a backpack: Hikes in 1920s

Haim Berger immigrated to Israel from Ukraine in 1921. After studying the general history and history of the Land of Israel, he guided tours across country and its surroundings. First story in series

Haim Berger (1900-1983) was born in the town of Sambor (Lviv, Ukraine). He joined the Shomer Hatzair Movement and immigrated to Israel with the group in 1921. He later worked in construction and agriculture, and in 1928 began studying general history and history of the Land of Israel at the Hebrew University.

 

He then began working as a tour guide across the country and its surroundings, and engaged in research of the history of the land. He published articles in newspapers and released a book.

 

Gilad, Haim's son, provided me with a large collection of his father's photographs which were taken during his hikes. Alongside the photos, Haim would write the names of the places in Hebrew and in Arabic.

 

In the coming weeks, we will present a selection of his photos, with some of Haim's original captions.


 

1. Nebi Rubin's grave, 1932


 

2. Nahal Sorek (Rubin) effluent, June 2, 1928


3. Nebi Rubin, 1932


 

4. Gaza, Hamam al-Sumra (Samaritans' bathhouse)


 

5. Gaza Port, 1928


 

6. The great mosque in Gaza, Jamaa al-Kabir


 

7. My lecture at Tel Ajoul, south of Gaza, 1932


 

8. Hartob station upon our return from the Twins' Cave


 

9. Noah Cave in Gezer, 1929


 

10. Bnot Noah spring in the Judea Mountains, 1932


 

11. Nahal Sorek station, 1929


 

12. The train between the mountains of Beitar


 

13. Abu al-Hourira grave in Yavne


 

14. The mosque in Yavne (Jamaat al-Kanisa), March 20, 1928


 

15. Be'er Tuvia (the first house)

 

  • For all trips to the past – click here

 


פרסום ראשון: 06.20.08, 13:12
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