Channels

Discovery of Arabic inscription
Photo: Assaf Avraham
Ancient Arabic discovery shows deep Jewish ties to Temple Mount
Despite UNESCO’s recent decision to disregard Jewish ties to Jerusalem’s holy sites, new archaeological discovery in a mosque near Hebron appears to demonstrate the deep Jewish roots with apparent Arabic references to the Jerusalem Temple.
Ancient Arabic writing discovered in a main mosque in the village of Nuba near Hebron proves that that one of the names used during the early stages of Islam for the Dome of the Rock was ‘Beit Almakdas,’ a term which appears to be based on the Jewish description of the Jerusalem Temple, the Beit HaMikdash.

 

  

The discovery comes against the background of UNESCO decision which has cast doubt on the Jewish connection with Temple Mount. Archeologists responsible for the discovery insist that the publication of their research was devoid of any political motives and had nothing to do with the recent resolution.

 

Inscription linking al-Aqsa mosque to the Jerusalem Temple (Photo: Assaf Avraham)
Inscription linking al-Aqsa mosque to the Jerusalem Temple (Photo: Assaf Avraham)

  

“The UNESCO decision, just a few days before the archeological conference, is a coincidence,” the archeologists said.

  

The research conducted by archeologists Assaf Avraham and Perez Reuven shows that the holy inscription is approximately 1,300 years old and illustrates the influence of Jewish tradition during the period which saw the completion of the occupation of Jerusalem.

  

The ancient inscription, hanging above the prayer area in a mosque built during the reign of Umar ibn al-Khattab (634-644) directly links the al-Aqsa Mosque with the Jewish temple, the researchers claim, due to the word selection connecting ‘Beit Almakdas’ and the al-Aqsa mosque.

  

“In the name of Allah the Merciful and Compassionate, this property in Nuba, in its borders and territories, is dedicated to Beit Almakdas and the al-Aqsa mosque by the Prince Umar ibn al-Khattab for Allah to be praised,” the inscription states on the 60cm by 40cm limestone slab.

 

Inscription discovered in the mosque: Photo: Assaf Avraham
Inscription discovered in the mosque: Photo: Assaf Avraham

  

According to the archeologists, “at least one of the main names for the Dome of the Rock during the first centuries of Islam was ‘Beit Almakdas’, which preserved the Hebrew name of ‘Beit HaMikdash.’”  

 

Assaf Avraham and Reuven Peres (Photo: Assaf Avraham)
Assaf Avraham and Reuven Peres (Photo: Assaf Avraham)

 

“The choice to use the words ‘Beit Almakdas’ is no accident,” Avraham explained. “The use of this name is the result of the profound influence of Jewish influence on the development of Islam during its genesis.”

 

The researchers concluded that the inscription, along with other Islamic traditions, indicates that the construction of the Dome of the Rock is inextricably linked to the Jewish presence prior to, and during its erection.

 

 new comment
See all talkbacks "Ancient Arabic discovery shows deep Jewish ties to Temple Mount"
Warning:
This will delete your current comment