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Photo: Yaron Brenner
Will it disperse this crowd?
Photo: Yaron Brenner
Photo: Ahiya Raved
Eldad has demanded proof to show the device poses no harm
Photo: Ahiya Raved
Crowd-dispersal tactic arrives in Gaza
Security forces may use non-violent device to disperse settler demonstrations during next week's pullout; device emits burst of high frequency sound painful to the ears

A crowd-dispersal tactic used to help break up violent Palestinian demonstrations will be used in Gush Katif should the need arise during the pullout, scheduled to begin next week.

 

The innovative approach was originally developed to disperse violent Palestinian and left-wing protesters by emitting painful bursts of sound at a high frequency.

 

Now, it seems it may be used for the first time against settlers.

 

However, Gush Katif residents say they are already stocking up on earplugs, adding, "thousands more (earplugs) are on the way to the Gush."

 

The non-violent tactic was developed over two years following a special request by the Defense Ministry to find a way to break up large crowds without using live fire and physical contact between security forces and protesters.

 

The device emits several bursts of high frequency sounds, about one minute in length, which can be heard from dozens of meters away.

 

Defense officials have confirmed with Ynet that the device is already in the Gaza Strip.

 

Permanent damage? 

 

Knesset member Aryeh Eldad (National Union) submitted an inquiry regarding the device to the Internal Security Ministry, and received a response that "the device not does exist."

 

"They're lying, because the police make a habit out of lying," he said. "Only now it has come to my attention that the Arabs were correct all those years, when they claimed the police lie and distort. It's very rare nowadays to find a policeman who can give you an honest account."

 

Besides his concern for the police's honesty, Eldad - a doctor by profession and former Chief IDF Medical Officer - is concerned about the repercussions of using the device.

 

"I demanded they present me with findings that prove using the device does not cause permanent damage to pregnant women and children or nerve damage," he said. "Until now I have not received a response." 

 

- Associated Press contributed to the report

 

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