Hizbullah leader Hassan Nasrallah
Photo: AFP
Hizbullah video game modeled on Second Lebanon War
Terror group releases 'Special Forces 2' requires players to kidnap reservists, launch Katyushas, 'cleanse' Bint Jbeil of IDF troops

Hizbullah is using video games in order to hammer home the point that last summer's war was a great success for Lebanon: Thursday, the terrorist group released 'Special Forces 2', whose goal is to present the war to the younger generation "in the right light."


The plot of the game is based on the events of the Second Lebanon War. It begins with the kidnap of IDF reservists Ehud Goldwasser and Eldad Regev.


During the game, players must launch missiles at IDF gunboats, tanks and helicopters , as well as launching Katyushas towards "Israeli settlements" without knowing where they fall.


"The July 2006 war ended on August 14, but the electronic war goes on," said Ali Dahar, a Hizbullah media official. "Following the success of the first game, we decided to put out a sequel and the outbreak of the war gave us a plot for it.


"It's the right of every Lebanese child to know what happened in southern Lebanon in order to be able to tell of jihad and resistance," he added.


According to reports, 'Special Forces 2' is an impressive, 3-D game. There are five "Hizbullah warriors" to help each player in his missions. The game has eight levels, which begin after one level of "training".


Special Forces 2 (Photo: Reuters) 


The first mission, of course, is to "take two soldiers prisoner" and imitates the circumstances surrounding the kidnapping of Goldwasser and Regev – the player must aim a missile at two IDF jeeps and hit at least one of them. Afterwards, he must blow a hole in the border fence in order to capture the soldiers.


Also in this stage, the player must infiltrate an IDF base in order to steal classified information. In subsequent stages, the player must fight the Israeli enemy in Bint Jbeil and Maroun al-Ras and "cleanse" the villages of IDF soldiers. In advanced stages of the game, the player is required to hit tanks and gunboats with missiles.


The real goal of the game is to constitute "an alternative to Western culture… with its empty content and tawdry goals, which are fed to us," said Daher.


In response to claims that this video game is just like American ones, he responded that "although it contains violence, it also has a message and principles. The Americans made a game in which soldiers conquer Beirut.


"It's natural that we will make a game in the opposite direction. We are not producing a game that has nothing more than violence. The difference is that a child (who plays our game) will not be playing a pointless game with no point and no message," he said.


The game is being sold at the relatively low price of ten dollars. Hizbullah intends to market the game soon in Syria, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates.


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