Shoah survivors set up museum at home - Israel Jewish Scene, Ynetnews
 
ynetnews
web


   Israel News

Israel News
World News
Israel Opinion
Jewish
Israel Business
Israel Culture
Israel Travel
Sense of Mission

Yellow patch. One of items exhibited by Wodzislawski couple in their private home (archives) Photo: Reuters
Yellow patch. One of items exhibited by Wodzislawski couple in their private home (archives) Photo: Reuters
 
 

Shoah survivors set up museum at home

Yaakov and Irena Wodzislawski dedicate their lives, private home to commemoration of Holocaust. Just days after winning award on behalf of Yad Vashem, Yaakov dies. 'I will continue his work,' widow vows

Danny Adeno Abebe
Published: 06.10.13, 13:01 / Israel Jewish Scene

VIDEO - A prisoner's jacket from Auschwitz, a food bowl from Treblinka, metal pins worn by the Jewish ghetto police, hundreds of postcards from concentration camps and a yellow patch – these are just some of the items exhibited by Holocaust surviving couple Yaakov and Irena Wodzislawski, who have dedicated their lives and private home to the commemoration of the mass slaughter of Jews by the Nazis during World War II.

 

Video courtesy of jn1.tv

 

The two were recently informed that they had won a lifetime achievement award on behalf of Yad Vashem, Israel's Holocaust memorial museum and archive, but Yaakov died several days later and will not get to hold the prize in his hands.

  

Symbolic Move
Shoah memories live on through tattoos / jn1.tv
Relatives of Holocaust survivors get tattoos which closely replicate brandings that Nazis forced upon Jews. 'It's a statement of collective identity,' sociology profession explains
Full story

The couple turned their entire four-story private home in the city of Ariel into a Holocaust memorial museum dedicated to testimonies, which contains hundreds of items they collected.

 

Thousands of teenagers and soldiers have visited the place on a daily basis. With a smile on their faces, the couple would invite them into their home and tell them about their experiences during the Holocaust, using pictures and letters of Jews from concentration camps to demonstrate their stories. At the end of the emotional lectures, they would serve their listeners drinks and cookies.

 

About a month ago, they were officially recognized for their unusual work and were informed that they had won a prize for excellence in the field of Holocaust studies on behalf of Yad Vashem. But Yaakov, who came up with the idea to set up a private museum, passed away several days after receiving the news.

 

Irena Wodzislawski received the prize from Yad Vashem's International School for Holocaust Studies on behalf of her husband.

 

"I miss him very much," she said. "He was sick for a long time and was informed of the prize just several days before he passed away. He told me it was a little too late.

I vowed to continue his work, and the house will remain open and serve as a museum for children who will arrive to see what we all experienced."

 

"We chose to honor the Wodzislawski couple, who sought to devote their lives and home out of a sense of mission," said Sarit Hoch-Markovitz, director of teacher training at Yad Vashem's International School for Holocaust Studies. "We regret the fact that Yaakov could not make it to the ceremony."

 

 

commentcomment   PrintPrint  Send to friendSend to friend   
Tag with Del.icio.us Bookmark to del.icio.us



 
1 Talkbacks for this article    See all talkbacks
Please wait for the talkbacks to load

 

RSS RSS | About | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms of use | Advertise with us | Site Map

Site developed by  YIT Advanced Technology Solutions