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Anas al-Liby Photo: AFP
Anas al-Liby Photo: AFP
 
 

US captures al-Qaeda leader in Libya; raids Somalia

Pentagon says senior figure wanted for role in East Africa embassy bombings arrested in Tripoli; raid in Somali town fails to capture intended target from al-Shabab. Kerry: Terrorists can run but they can't hide

News agencies
Published: 10.06.13, 08:50 / Israel News

US forces launched raids in Libya and Somalia on Saturday, two weeks after the deadly Islamist attack on a Nairobi shopping mall, capturing a top al-Qaeda figure wanted for the 1998 US embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania, US officials said.

 

The Pentagon said senior al-Qaeda figure Anas al Liby was seized in the raid in Libya, but a US official said the raid on the Somali town of Barawe failed to capture or kill the intended target from the al-Qaeda-linked al Shabab movement.

 

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US Secretary of State John Kerry said Sunday that the military raids send the message that terrorists "can run but they can't hide."

 

Kerry, in Bali for an economic summit, was the highest-level administration to speak about the operations yet. He made his comments at an event at a port for Balinese tuna fishermen.

 

"We hope that this makes clear that the United States of America will never stop in the effort to hold those accountable who conduct acts of terror," Kerry said. "Members of al-Qaeda and other terrorist organizations literally can run but they can't hide."

 

Kerry vowed the United States would "continue to try to bring people to justice in an appropriate way with hopes that ultimately these kinds of activities against everybody in the world will stop."

 

Liby, believed to be 49, has been under US indictment for his alleged role in the East Africa embassy bombings that killed 224 people.

 

The US government has also been offering a $5 million reward for information leading to his capture, under the State Department's Rewards for Justice program.

 

"As the result of a US counterterrorism operation, Abu Anas al Liby is currently lawfully detained by the US military in a secure location outside of Libya," Pentagon spokesman George Little said without elaborating.

 

Liby, also known as Nazih al-Ragye, was arrested at dawn in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, as he was heading home after morning prayers, a neighbor and militia sources said.

 

CNN reported in September last year that Liby had been seen Tripoli. It quoted Western intelligence sources as saying there was concern that he may have been tasked with establishing an al-Qaeda network in Libya.

 

That CNN report quoted counterterrorism analysts as saying that Liby may not have been apprehended then because of the delicate security situation in much of the country, where former jihadists hold sway. It quoted one intelligence source as saying that Liby appeared to have arrived in Libya in the spring of 2011, during the country's civil war.

 

The Pentagon confirmed US military personnel had been involved in an operation against what it called "a known al Shabab terrorist," in Somalia, but gave no more details.

 

One US official, speaking to Reuters on condition of anonymity, said the al Shabaab leader targeted in the operation was neither captured nor killed.

 

US officials did not identify the target. They said US forces, trying to avoid civilian casualties, disengaged after inflicting some al Shabab casualties. They said no US personnel were wounded or killed in the operation, which one US source said was carried out by a Navy SEAL team.

 

Somalia firefight

A Somali intelligence official said the target of the raid at Barawe, about 110 miles (180 km) south of Mogadishu, was a Chechen commander, who had been wounded and his guard killed. Police said a total of seven people were killed.

 

The New York Times quoted a spokesman for al Shabaab as saying that one of its fighters had been killed in an exchange of gunfire but that the group had beaten back the assault.

 

It quoted an unnamed US security official as saying that the Barawe raid was planned a week and a half ago in response to the al Shabaab assault on a Nairobi shopping mall last month in which at least 67 people died.

 

"It was prompted by the Westgate attack," the official said.

 

Residents said fighting erupted at about 3 a.m. (midnight GMT). "We were awoken by heavy gunfire last night, we thought an al Shabaab base at the beach was captured," Sumira Nur, a mother of four, told Reuters from Barawe on Saturday.

 

"We also heard sounds of shells, but we do not know where they landed."

 

The New York Times quoted witnesses as saying that the firefight lasted more than an hour, with helicopters called in for air support.

 

The paper quoted a senior Somali government official as saying that the government "was pre-informed about the attack."

 

Earlier, al Shabaab militants said British and Turkish special forces had raided Barawe, killing a rebel fighter, but that a British officer had also been killed and others wounded.

 

Britain's Defence Ministry said it was not aware of any such British involvement. A Turkish Foreign Ministry official also denied any Turkish part in such an action.

 

In 2009, helicopter-borne US special forces killed senior al-Qaeda militant Saleh Ali Saleh Nabhan in a raid in southern Somalia. Nabhan was suspected of building the bomb that killed 15 people at an Israeli-owned hotel on the Kenyan coast in 2002.

 

The United States has used drones to kill fighters in Somalia in the past. In January 2012, members of the elite US Navy SEALs rescued two aid workers after killing their nine kidnappers.

 

Shabaab leader Ahmed Godane, also known as Mukhtar Abu al-Zubayr, has described the Nairobi mall attack as retaliation for Kenya's incursion in October 2011 into southern Somalia to crush the insurgents. It has raised concern in the West over the operations of Shabaab in the region.

 

 

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