Channels

Photo: EPA
Car plows into protesters in Charlottesville
Photo: EPA
Car plows into crowd protesting against white nationalists in Virginia, killing 1
One dead and at least 26 others injured after car careened into the line of several hundred people in Charlottesville; driver arrested; incident happens 2 hours after violent clashes between white nationalists rallying against plans to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, and others protesting the racism.

A car plowed into a crowd of several hundred people peacefully protesting a white nationalist rally Saturday in a Virginia college town, killing one person and sending at least 26 others to hospitals. The driver was arrested.

 

 

Matt Korbon, a 22-year-old University of Virginia student, said counter-protesters were marching when "suddenly there was just this tire screeching sound." A silver sedan smashed into another car, then backed up, plowing through "a sea of people."

 

Car plowing into protesters

סגורסגור

שליחה לחבר

 הקלידו את הקוד המוצג
תמונה חדשה

שלח
הסרטון נשלח לחברך

סגורסגור

הטמעת הסרטון באתר שלך

 קוד להטמעה:

 

People scattered, running for safety in different directions, he said.

 

It happened about two hours after violent clashes broke out between white nationalists, who descended on the town to rally against the city's plans to remove a statue of the Confederal Gen. Robert E. Lee, and others who arrived to protest the racism.

 

Photo: EPA
Photo: EPA

Photo: AP
Photo: AP

Hundreds of people chanted, threw punches, hurled water bottles and unleashed chemical sprays. At least eight were injured and one arrested in connection to the earlier violence.

 

Gov. Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emergency, and police dressed in riot gear ordered people out.

 

Photo: AFP
Photo: AFP

 

Photo: Reuters
Photo: Reuters

  

Right-wing blogger Jason Kessler had called for what he termed a "pro-white" rally to protest the city of Charlottesville's decision to remove the confederate statue from a downtown park.

 

It's the latest confrontation in Charlottesville since the city, located about 100 miles outside of Washington, DC, voted earlier this year to remove a statue of Lee.

 

Violent clashes in Charlotteville

סגורסגור

שליחה לחבר

 הקלידו את הקוד המוצג
תמונה חדשה

שלח
הסרטון נשלח לחברך

סגורסגור

הטמעת הסרטון באתר שלך

 קוד להטמעה:

 

In May, a torch-wielding group that included prominent white nationalist Richard Spencer gathered around the statue for a nighttime protest, and in July, about 50 members of a North Carolina-based KKK group traveled there for a rally, where they were met by hundreds of counter-protesters.

 

Photo: AFP
Photo: AFP

 

Photo: AFP
Photo: AFP

 

Kessler said this week that the rally is partly about the removal of Confederate symbols but also about free speech and "advocating for white people."

 

"This is about an anti-white climate within the Western world and the need for white people to have advocacy like other groups do," he said in an interview.

 

Photo: AFP
Photo: AFP

Photo: Reuters
Photo: Reuters

  

Among in attendance were Confederate heritage groups, KKK members, militia groups and "alt-right" activists, who generally espouse a mix of racism, white nationalism and populism.

   

There were also fights Friday night, when hundreds of white nationalists marched through the University of Virginia campus carrying torches.

 

A university spokesman said one person was arrested and several people were injured.

 

Charlottesville Mayor Michael Signer said he was disgusted that the white nationalists had come to his town and blamed President Donald Trump for inflaming racial prejudices with his campaign last year.

 

"I'm not going to make any bones about it. I place the blame for a lot of what you're seeing in American today right at the doorstep of the White House and the people around the president," Signer said. 

 

Photo: AFP
Photo: AFP

Photo: AFP
Photo: AFP

 

Charlottesville, nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, is a liberal-leaning city that's home to the flagship University of Virginia and Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson.

 

The statue's removal is part of a broader city effort to change the way Charlottesville's history of race is told in public spaces. The city has also renamed Lee Park, where the statue stands, and Jackson Park, named for Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson. They're now called Emancipation Park and Justice Park, respectively.

 

For now, the Lee statue remains. A group called the Monument Fund filed a lawsuit arguing that removing the statue would violate a state law governing war memorials. A judge has agreed to a temporary injunction that blocks the city from removing the statue for six months.

 

 new comment
See all talkbacks "Car plows into crowd protesting against white nationalists in Virginia, killing 1"
Warning:
This will delete your current comment