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Kim Jong Un
Photo: EPA
UN report: North Korea cooperates militarily with Syria, tries to sell weapons to Middle East groups
A confidential UN report reveals that North Korea has not stopped its nuclear, missile program in violations of UN sanctions; In addition, the country is helping militarily to Assad's regime in Syria and is trying to sell weapons to Middle East entities, such as Yemen's Houthis; Meanwhile, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the process of ending North Korea's nuclear programme would take time but it would be done within a timeline set by the leaders of the two countries.

Confidential, new UN report reveals North Korea is cooperating militarily with Syria and has been trying to sell weapons to entities in the Middle East, including Yemen's Houthis.

 

 

The report, seen by Reuters on Friday, also says that North Korea has not stopped its nuclear and missile programs in violation of United Nations sanctions.

 

The six-month report by independent experts monitoring the implementation of UN sanctions was submitted to the Security Council North Korea sanctions committee late on Friday.

 

Satellite images of nuclear facilities  (Photo: Planet Labs Inc./James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at Middlebury Institute)
Satellite images of nuclear facilities (Photo: Planet Labs Inc./James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at Middlebury Institute)

 

"(North Korea) has not stopped its nuclear and missile programs and continued to defy Security Council resolutions through a massive increase in illicit ship-to-ship transfers of petroleum products, as well as through transfers of coal at sea during 2018," the experts wrote in the 149-page report.

 

The North Korean mission to the United Nations did not respond to a request for comment on the report.

 

Pyongyang also violated a textile ban by exporting more than $100 million in goods between October 2017 and March 2018 to China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Turkey and Uruguay, the report said.

 

The report comes as Russia and China suggest the Security Council discuss easing sanctions after US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met for the first time in June and Kim pledged to work toward denuclearization.

 

Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump (Photo: AP)
Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump (Photo: AP)

 

The United States and other council members have said there must be strict enforcement of sanctions until Pyongyang acts.

 

The UN experts said illicit ship-to-ship transfers of petroleum products in international waters had "increased in scope, scale and sophistication." They said a key North Korean technique was to turn off a ship's tracking system, but that they were also physically disguising ships and using smaller vessels.

 

The Security Council has unanimously sanctioned North Korea since 2006 in a bid to choke off funding for Pyongyang's nuclear and ballistic missile programs, banning exports including coal, iron, lead, textiles and seafood, and capping imports of crude oil and refined petroleum products.

 

The experts said "prohibited military cooperation with the Syrian Arab Republic has continued unabated." They said North Korean technicians engaged in ballistic missile and other banned activities have visited Syria in 2011, 2016 and 2017.

 

The report said that experts were investigating efforts by the North Korean Ministry of Military Equipment and Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID) to supply conventional arms and ballistic missiles to Yemen's Houthi group.

 

A country, which was not identified, showed the experts a July 13, 2016 letter from a Houthi leader inviting the North Koreans to meet in Damascus "to discuss the issue of the transfer of technology and other matters of mutual interest," according to the report.

 

The experts said that the effectiveness of financial sanctions was being systematically undermined by "deceptive practices" of North Korea.

 

Mike Pompeo (Photo: Reuters)
Mike Pompeo (Photo: Reuters)

 

In the meantime, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Saturday the process of ending North Korea's nuclear programme would take time but he was optimistic that it would be done within a timeline set by the leaders of the two countries.

 

It was important to maintain diplomatic and economic pressure on the North, he said, and the United States takes very seriously any detraction from enforcing UN sanctions, Pompeo said on the sidelines of a regional conference.

 

"I'm optimistic that we will get this done in the timeline and the world will celebrate what the UN Security Council has demanded," Pompeo told a news conference.

 

"The work has begun. The process of achieving denuclearisation of the (Korean) peninsula is one that I think we have all known would take some time."

 


פרסום ראשון: 08.04.18, 09:07