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A tombstone with Arabic and Hebrew words at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo
Photo: Reuters
As bigotry stirs globally, Bosnian Jews, Muslims recall lesson in tolerance
Members of both faiths gather in Sarajevo to remember the 1819 rescue of a dozen members of the city's Jewish community by local Muslims; 'Bosnian Muslims and Jews are one body,' says country's grand mufti

SARAJEVO - Bosnia's Jews and Muslims on Thursday marked the bicentenary of the rescue of a dozen Jews from an Ottoman-era governor's jail, saying their liberation by Sarajevo Muslims is a great example of co-existence at a time of rising global sectarian hatred.

 

The 1819 rescue, which happened during a Muslim uprising, and consequent removal of corrupt Turkish governor Mehmed Ruzdi Pasha is a holiday for Sarajevo's Jews, known as Purim di Saray. The governor had sought a huge ransom to spare the Jews' lives.

 

 

Eli Tauber stands near the resting place of a Jewish historian, whose real name was Mose Attias, known as Zeki Effendi Rafaelovic, at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nov. 6, 2019 (Photo: Reuters)
Eli Tauber stands near the resting place of a Jewish historian, whose real name was Mose Attias, known as Zeki Effendi Rafaelovic, at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nov. 6, 2019 (Photo: Reuters)

The event was marked by a joint exhibition and conference depicting the events and celebrating nearly 500 years of peaceful coexistence between Jews and their Muslim neighbours, as well as between Jews and Orthodox Serbs and Catholic Croats.

 

"Bosnian Muslims and Jews are one body," said Bosnia's Muslim top cleric, Grand Mufti Husein Kavazovic.

 

"Amid the ever rising evil of anti-Semitism and Islamophobia ... we are renewing our pledge that we will remain good neighbours who will watch over each other as we did in the past."


A tombstone with Arabic and Hebrew words is seen at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nov. 6, 2019
A tombstone with Arabic and Hebrew words is seen at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nov. 6, 2019

 

The Muslim rebellion was recorded by renowned Sarajevo Jewish historian Mose Rafael Attias, also known as Zeki Effendi, in his book Sarajevo Megillah.

 

Sarajevo Jewish historian Mose Rafael Attias
Sarajevo Jewish historian Mose Rafael Attias

 

The book's title is a reference to the Book of Esther, which is read aloud during the Jewish holiday of Purim.

 

The holiday celebrates the Jews' salvation from genocide in ancient Persia and is normally held in about March.

 

Attias studied Islam and mediaeval Persian literature and was a passionate interfaith advocate.

 


Eli Tauber shows a gravestone where the text is engraved in three languages on the resting place of a Jew whose real name is Mose Attias, known as Zeki Efendi Rafaelovic, at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nov. 6, 2019
Eli Tauber shows a gravestone where the text is engraved in three languages on the resting place of a Jew whose real name is Mose Attias, known as Zeki Efendi Rafaelovic, at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nov. 6, 2019
 

His tombstone, which has epitaphs in Bosnian, Hebrew and Turkish, the latter inscribed in Arabic script, has been renovated at the town's Jewish cemetery as part of the Purim bicentenary.

 

"The tombstone itself is a proof of Sarajevo's multiculturalism," Eli Tauber, an author and historian, told Reuters. "Close links between our communities are unique. The way we mark Purim is also unprecedented and could serve as a role model to the rest of the world."

 

Jews have played a significant role in Sarajevo's cultural and economic life for 450 years. Expelled after the Christian re-conquest of the Iberian peninsula, they found sanctuary in the city, then part of the Ottoman Empire.

 


Eli Tauber stands near the resting place of a Jewish historian, whose real name was Mose Attias, known as Zeki Effendi Rafaelovic, at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nov. 6, 2019
Eli Tauber stands near the resting place of a Jewish historian, whose real name was Mose Attias, known as Zeki Effendi Rafaelovic, at the Jewish cemetery in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nov. 6, 2019

At the height of the city's influence, Sarajevo had eight synagogues serving some 12,000 Jews. But most of them were killed during World War Two, when the city was occupied by Nazi Germany. Fewer than 1,250 remained.

 

The community recovered somewhat in the post-war era but was dealt another blow with Yugoslavia's bloody collapse and the subsequent siege of Sarajevo, the longest in modern history.

 

Before the Bosnian 1992-95 war, Sarajevo was a multi-ethnic melting pot - mosques, churches and synagogues standing virtually side by side. It afterwards become predominantly Muslim, but some 800 Jews living in the town remain an important part of its multi-ethnic identity

 


פרסום ראשון: 11.08.19, 19:08
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