Prime Minister Naftali Bennett's Noviy God video
Prime Minister Naftali Bennett wishes for Noviy God in a posted video
Photo: Facebook
Ded Moroz and the Snow Maiden, Noviy God symbols

Politicians wish 'Noviy God' to former-Soviet voters

Well wishers include Prime Minister Naftali Bennett and President Isaac Herzog, as well as opposition head Netanyahu, whose holiday greeting likened legislation tabled by the government to Soviet Russia

i24NEWS |
Published: 01.03.22, 12:40
As the world welcomed the New Year, some of Israel's top lawmakers took to social media to emphasize and celebrate the Russian New Year celebration of "Noviy God."
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  • Noviy God - the Russian phrase for New Year marking the Russian New Year's Eve and New Year's Day celebration - is celebrated in many post-Soviet states, and by over a million people in Israel.
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    נובי גוד
    נובי גוד
    Ded Moroz and the Snow Maiden, Noviy God symbols
    Among those who noted the holiday was Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, who wished those celebrating Noviy God a happy holiday on his Facebook page - while President Isaac Herzog released a statement with Russian-based motifs.
    4 View gallery
    Prime Minister Naftali Bennett's Noviy God video
    Prime Minister Naftali Bennett's Noviy God video
    Prime Minister Naftali Bennett wishes for Noviy God in a posted video
    (Photo: Facebook)
    Opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu took things a bit further with a video shot alongside Soviet Ukraine-born Israeli activist Semion Grafman, aimed at lambasting the current government.
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    Noviy God decorations in Nazareth
    Noviy God decorations in Nazareth
    Noviy God decorations in Nazareth
    (Photo: Sharbel Abu Darwish)
    In the video, the two are seen mocking the controversial Facebook Bill promoted by Justice Minister Gideon Sa’ar that would allow for the removal of social media content deemed harmful to personal or national security.
    4 View gallery
    מנטה
    מנטה
    Ukraine-born Israeli right-wing activist Semion Grafman
    (Photo:Tal Shahar)
    Following a purposefully censored opening address by Grafman, the Ukrainian activist continues to say that democracy was why he left the Soviet Union for Israel, alluding to the former premier's claims that Israel's democracy is in peril.
    According to Grafman, more than one million people came to Israel from the Soviet Union, which is why Israeli politicians often try to impress them around the New Year.

    Story republished with permission from i24NEWS
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