People look at a painting by Salomon van Ruysdael titled River Landscape with Ferry, left, at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on February 4, 2006.
People look at a painting by Salomon van Ruysdael titled River Landscape with Ferry, left, at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on February 4, 2006
Photo: AP
People look at a painting by Salomon van Ruysdael titled River Landscape with Ferry, left, at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on February 4, 2006

Dutch attempt to restitute art stolen during Nazi era

Netherlands launches campaign to track original owners of thousands of different items looted by the Third Reich during WWII; items that cannot be traced will likely be handed over to Jewish communities, museums, institutions

AFP |
Published: 06.28.21, 18:14
The Netherlands is to verify the origin of works of art stolen by the Nazis during World War II and hand over to the Jewish community objects that cannot be traced, the government said recently.
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  • A total of 3,040 items from the collection of cultural works returned to the country after the war will be examined.
    2 צפייה בגלריה
    People look at a painting by Salomon van Ruysdael titled River Landscape with Ferry, left, at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on February 4, 2006.
    People look at a painting by Salomon van Ruysdael titled River Landscape with Ferry, left, at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on February 4, 2006.
    People look at a painting by Salomon van Ruysdael titled River Landscape with Ferry, left, at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on February 4, 2006
    (Photo: AP)
    No proper research into the origin of the works has been carried out since 2007.
    "We have to keep up our efforts to restitute to the right people the cultural assets which were unintentionally lost or obtained illegally during World War II," Culture Minister Inge Van Engelshoven said in a statement.
    "We will succeed through systematic research and better communication," she added.
    The work will begin next year, seeking new information on the origins and original owners of the works.
    2 צפייה בגלריה
    Nazi looted painting
    Nazi looted painting
    A visitor in 2005 views the impressionist painting called Rue St.-Honore, Apres-Midi, Effet de Pluie, painted in 1897 by Camille Pissarro, on display in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid
    (Photo: AP)
    If no new light can be shed, the authorities will decide with the Central Jewish Council what to do with the works that are likely to be handed over to Jewish communities, museums or institutions.
    The move launches a "bolstered restitution policy" which will cost 1.5 million euros ($1.8 million) over the next four years, the education, culture and science ministry said.
    Until now, the origins of artwork were only checked in case a restitution request was filed or if researchers from the center for the restitution of valuable objects took interest.

    Reprinted with permission from i24NEWS.
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