Mary Ann Mendoza (L) standing next to U.S. President Donald Trump
Mary Ann Mendoza (L) standing next to U.S. President Donald Trump
Photo: AP
Mary Ann Mendoza (L) standing next to U.S. President Donald Trump

U.S. Republicans drop speaker for retweeting anti-Semitic tirade

Hours before her planned speech at RNC, Mary Ann Mendoza retweets a thread posted by member of QAnon movement, which promotes an age-old conspiracy about a global Jewish cabal bent on terrorizing non-Jews

AFP |
Published: 08.26.20 , 11:54
A woman preparing to endorse U.S. President Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention on Tuesday was abruptly booted from the lineup after posting about a Jewish conspiracy to control the world, U.S. media reported.
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  • Mary Ann Mendoza, a so-called "Angel Mom," was scheduled to speak Tuesday night about her son Brandon, a police officer killed in 2014 by a drunk driver who was in the country illegally.
    Mary Ann Mendoza (L) standing next to U.S. President Donald Trump Mary Ann Mendoza (L) standing next to U.S. President Donald Trump
    Mary Ann Mendoza (L) standing next to U.S. President Donald Trump
    (Photo: AP)
    But her appearance was scrapped when she highlighted a theory earlier Tuesday peddled by far-right conspiracy movement QAnon that highlights an anti-Semitic trope about a global Jewish cabal bent on terrorizing non-Jewish "goyim."
    "Do yourself a favor and read this thread," Mendoza, a member of the Trump campaign advisory board, tweeted early Tuesday to her 41,000 followers.
    Mendoza deleted her tweet after it was published by The Daily Beast and other media, and she posted a message of apology.
    "I retweeted a very long thread earlier without reading every post within the thread," she wrote.
    "My apologies for not paying attention to the intent of the whole message. That does not reflect my feelings or personal thoughts whatsoever."
    The thread promotes an age-old conspiracy that a goldsmith summoned businessmen to his home in 1773 and stated that by pooling their money they could "gain control of the wealth, natural resources, and manpower of the entire world."
    Supporters displaying QAnon posters appeared at Trump rallies last summer Supporters displaying QAnon posters appeared at Trump rallies last summer
    Supporters displaying QAnon posters appeared at Trump rallies last summer
    (Photo: Gettyimages )
    It also pressed the narrative that the Rothschilds, a wealthy German-Jewish banking family, created a plot to "make the goyim destroy each other."
    Trump was asked about QAnon last week and sparked controversy by refusing to dismiss it.
    "I don't know much about the movement other than I understand they like me very much, which I appreciate," Trump told reporters in the White House last Wednesday.

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