Police lock protesters inside a mosque on Temple Mount while Jews visit the site

Israel police lock Palestinian protesters in Temple Mount mosque as Jews visit

Palestinians hurled stones and furniture at force, out of windows at mosque in protest of Jews entering holy compound during the Shavuot holiday; Police say action meant to prevent clashes and rioting

Elior Levy |
Updated: 06.05.22, 10:46
Police locked a group of Palestinians in a mosque on the Temple Mount complex on Sunday after they were suspected of violence against Jews visiting the site, on the occasion of Shavuot.
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  • The protesters threw stones and furniture at the force, out of the mosque windows. No injuries were reported.
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    פלסטינים מתבצרים במסגד אל אקצא ומיידים אבנים על כוחות הביטחון
    פלסטינים מתבצרים במסגד אל אקצא ומיידים אבנים על כוחות הביטחון
    Police lock protesters inside a mosque on Temple Mount while Jews visit the site
    The police have used the same tactic of locking protesters in one of the buildings on the holy site, to separate them from visiting Jews and prevent clashes.
    During last week's Jerusalem Day, a record 2,600 Jews entered the Temple Mount compound, but despite the Jewish visitors violating the terms allowing their access to the Moslem controlled site – by waving Israeli flags, bowing in prayer and singing Israel's national anthem, rioting was avoided for the most part, the police said.
    2 View gallery
    פלסטינים מתבצרים במסגד אל אקצא ומיידים אבנים על כוחות הביטחון
    פלסטינים מתבצרים במסגד אל אקצא ומיידים אבנים על כוחות הביטחון
    Jews enter Temple Mount compound during Shavuot holiday
    Shavuot, in the Jewish tradition, was in ancient times, one of the three holidays when all ancient Israelites who were able, would make a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem, as commanded by the Torah.
    Right wing religious groups have been increasing their visits to the religious compound demanding a right to pray at what was where the location of the great temple 2,000 years ago and is considered the holiest site in Judaism.
    Their demands have fed Muslim Palestinian concerns that Jews were encroaching on their shrine in violation of the historic status quo agreement.
    Under the status quo agreed between Israel and the Joran immediately after the 1967 Six Day War and again in the peace agreement signed between the two countries in 1994, religious worship on the compound is restricted to Muslims, while Jews pray at the Western Wall nearby.

    First published: 10:43, 06.05.22
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