A gold leaf is added atop a date-flavoured "Abu Dhabi" doughnut created for the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah and in honour to the new diplomatic relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, at Kadosh pastry shop in Jerusalem
'Abu Dhabi' doughnut
Photo: AFP
'Abu Dhabi' doughnut

Israeli baker offers 'Abu Dhabi' doughnut for Hanukkah

Jerusalem-based chef Itzik Kadosh offers traditional pastry filled with Emirati dates, nougat and cream, topped with a golden leaf in honor of new diplomatic relations between the UAE and Israel

AFP |
Updated: 12.09.20 , 22:55
An enterprising Israeli baker is trying to tempt customers with a date-flavored doughnut from the Jewish state's new regional partner, the United Arab Emirates.
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  • Pastry chef Itzik Kadosh is offering the "Abu Dhabi" doughnut, with its Emirati dates, nougat and cream filling, topped with a golden leaf.
    A gold leaf is added atop a date-flavoured "Abu Dhabi" doughnut created for the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah and in honour to the new diplomatic relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, at Kadosh pastry shop in Jerusalem A gold leaf is added atop a date-flavoured "Abu Dhabi" doughnut created for the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah and in honour to the new diplomatic relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, at Kadosh pastry shop in Jerusalem
    'Abu Dhabi' doughnut
    (Photo: AFP)
    Coming in an ever-growing range of colors and fillings, the doughnut takes pride of place among dishes traditionally eaten over the week-long Jewish holiday of Hanukkah, which begins on Thursday.
    The Emirates in September signed a landmark U.S.-brokered deal to formalize relations with Israel, the first such agreement by a Gulf Arab state and only the third by any Arab country.
    "We want to pay tribute to Abu Dhabi and to peace in the region," Kadosh told AFP.
    Israeli pastry chef Itzik Kadosh Israeli pastry chef Itzik Kadosh
    Israeli pastry chef Itzik Kadosh
    (Photo: AFP)
    Each year Kadosh and his wife Kerem try to create new pastries for Hanukkah during which the Jews commonly eat foods fried in oil, especially the doughnut, or "sufganiyot" as it is called in Hebrew.
    Outside their well-know Jerusalem shop dozens of people, all wearing face-masks according to coronavirus regulations, queued to buy sweet pastries for the holiday also known as the Festival of Lights.
    This taste of the Gulf costs NIS 20 (five euros) compared to just NIS 7 for the standard jam-filled version.

    First published: 22:41 , 12.09.20
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