Gaza authorities discover over 60 Roman era graves

Hamas-run Antiquities and Tourism Ministry says 63 graves were identified, while bones and artifacts from one tomb date back to the second century; the ministry is working with French experts to learn more about the site

Associated Press|
Hamas authorities in Gaza on Sunday announced the discovery of over 60 tombs in an ancient burial site dating back to the Roman era.
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  • Work crews have been excavating the site since it was discovered last January during preparations for an Egyptian-funded housing project.
    2 View gallery
    A Palestinian excavation team works in a newly discovered Roman era cemetery in the Gaza Strip, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2022
    A Palestinian excavation team works in a newly discovered Roman era cemetery in the Gaza Strip, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2022
    A Palestinian excavation team works in a newly discovered Roman era cemetery in the Gaza Strip, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2022
    (Photo: AP / Fatima Shbair)
    Hiyam al-Bitar, a researcher from the Hamas-run Ministry of Antiquities and Tourism, said a total of 63 graves have been identified and that a set of bones and artifacts from one tomb dates back to the second century.
    She said the ministry is working with a team of French experts to learn more about the site. On Sunday, workers sifted through the soil and removed piles of dirt in wheelbarrows.
    2 View gallery
    A member of a Palestinian excavation team works in a newly discovered Roman era cemetery in the Gaza Strip, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2022
    A member of a Palestinian excavation team works in a newly discovered Roman era cemetery in the Gaza Strip, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2022
    A member of a Palestinian excavation team works in a newly discovered Roman era cemetery in the Gaza Strip, Sunday, Dec. 11, 2022
    (Photo: AP / Fatima Shbair)
    When the site was originally uncovered in the north-western part of the Strip, local residents, some of them using donkey-drawn carts, looted many artifacts, according to local media reports. Some of the residents said archaeological objects including casket covers and inscribed bricks were found a week before the ministry's announcement.
    Although the ancient cemetery is now blocked off from the public, construction on the housing project has continued and the site is surrounded by apartment buildings. Local media reported looting when the site was first discovered, with people using donkey-drawn carts to haul away items like a covered casket and inscribed bricks.

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